Document Type

Contribution to Books

Publication Date

2-1-2012

Abstract

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is one of the most important tools that lead current nanoscience and nanotechnology in many diverse areas including physics, chemistry, material engineering, and nano-biology. The current AFM technique has been routinely applied to forced unbinding processes of biomolecular complexes such as antibody-antigen binding, ligand-receptor pairs, protein unfolding, DNA unbinding, and RNA unfolding studies (Butt et al., 2005; Fritz & Anselmetti, 1997; Schumakovitch et al., 2002). AFMs have also been applied to intermolecular friction studies (Carpick et al., 1997; Colchero et al., 1996; Fernandez-Torres et al., 2003; Goddenhenrich et al., 1994; Goertz et al., 2007; B.I. Kim et al., 2001; Major et al., 2006). These previous techniques of measuring friction employed a lateral modulation of the sample relative to the cantilever as a means to measure normal force and friction force at the same time (Burns et al., 1999a; Carpick et al., 1997; Colchero et al., 1996; Goddenhenrich et al., 1994; Goertz et al., 2007; Major et al., 2006).

Comments

This document was originally published by InTech in Molecular Interaction. This work is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 license. Details regarding the use of this work can be found at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/legalcode. http://www.intechopen.com/

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