Abstract Title

Analyzing Electrolyte Degradation via Chemical, Thermal, and Electrochemical Methods

Disciplines

Materials Science and Engineering

Abstract

Sodium-ion battery technology is a promising and sustainable solution to the dominate lithium-ion battery. Limitations in the availability and cost of lithium are concerns for current commercialized battery technology. A battery system is comprised of three major components: an anode, a cathode, and an electrolyte. The presented work focuses on the identification of viable electrolytes based on performance and degradation studies in sodium based electrolytes. Electrolyte reactions play a critical role in the stability of the battery, and a better understanding of these products in the sodium system will lead to improved stability. Fundamental studies of chemical, thermal, and electrochemical stability have been performed in the presence of selected additives. Our current results show that water concentration plays a significant role in degradation, as samples with more water contained larger amounts of side reaction products, including the formation of hydrofluoric acid.

Comments

Poster #Th3

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Analyzing Electrolyte Degradation via Chemical, Thermal, and Electrochemical Methods

Sodium-ion battery technology is a promising and sustainable solution to the dominate lithium-ion battery. Limitations in the availability and cost of lithium are concerns for current commercialized battery technology. A battery system is comprised of three major components: an anode, a cathode, and an electrolyte. The presented work focuses on the identification of viable electrolytes based on performance and degradation studies in sodium based electrolytes. Electrolyte reactions play a critical role in the stability of the battery, and a better understanding of these products in the sodium system will lead to improved stability. Fundamental studies of chemical, thermal, and electrochemical stability have been performed in the presence of selected additives. Our current results show that water concentration plays a significant role in degradation, as samples with more water contained larger amounts of side reaction products, including the formation of hydrofluoric acid.