Publication Date

8-2021

Date of Final Oral Examination (Defense)

6-16-2021

Type of Culminating Activity

Dissertation

Degree Title

Doctor of Philosophy in Biomolecular Sciences

Department

Biology

Major Advisor

Matthew L. Ferguson, Ph.D.

Advisor

Eric Hayden, Ph.D.

Advisor

Brad Morrison, Ph.D.

Advisor

Allan Albig, Ph.D.

Abstract

Over the last few decades great advances have been made in our understanding of gene expression and the human genome. In 2003 the human genome was sequenced for the first time, allowing us to discover its true importance in human health. While sequencing the human genome was a great advance, it ultimately created more questions than it answered. It is known that the genomic sequence is extremely important in genome regulation, however recent studies have shown that the 4D (spatiotemporal) organization and dynamics of the living genome plays an equally critical role in regulation of gene expression. A key factor in the spatiotemporal genome is the temporal and spatial coordination of transcription factors required for gene expression. We focus on addressing both the spatial and temporal aspects of the genome through a cutting-edge microscopy technique known as 3D Orbital Tracking Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (3DOT-FCCS) in conjunction with Molecular Dynamics simulations. The synergistic use of these techniques will provide a clearer picture of the rules that govern the human genome.

DOI

https://10.18122/td.1863.boisestate

Available for download on Tuesday, August 01, 2023

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