Publication Date

8-2018

Date of Final Oral Examination (Defense)

5-2-2018

Type of Culminating Activity

Thesis

Degree Title

Master of Science in Economics

Department

Economics

Major Advisor

Michail Fragkias, Ph.D.

Advisor

Kelly Chen, Ph.D.

Advisor

Jaechoul Lee, Ph.D.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Abstract

This thesis examines how the effects of industrial diversity and specialization vary across geographical scales and classification levels. The notion of a robust institutional design, in conjunction with a regional resilience framework, is used to model how diversity and modularity affect unemployment through-out economic cycles. We use fixed effects models on employment data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Census Bureau in all available U.S. counties from 1998-2015. Key results suggest the optimal structure of industrial composition varies across scale, namely, that fine levels of industrial diversity are beneficial at higher levels of geographical scale (regions), whereas a broad type of industrial specialization is ideal for localities (counties/cities). This work is unique as it brings together notions of regional resilience and robustness and conducts analysis across multiple scales in attempts to identify the role of modular structure on the resiliency of a locality.

DOI

10.18122/td/1452/boisestate

Share

COinS