Publication Date

5-2018

Date of Final Oral Examination (Defense)

1-16-2018

Type of Culminating Activity

Thesis

Degree Title

Master of Science in STEM Education

Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Foundational Studies

Major Advisor

Michelle Carney, Ph.D.

Advisor

Keith W. Thiede, Ph.D.

Advisor

A.J. Zenkert, Ed.D.

Abstract

Problem solving is an aspect of mathematics that often proves difficult for many learners. The difficulty not always founded in a lack of mathematical knowledge, but also in the lack of experience to effectively activate existing knowledge, self-monitor, and reflect during problem-solving (Schoenfeld, 1992). This study investigated how primary teachers’ application of explicit instruction in the use of self-regulated learning (SRL) strategies affect students’ (a) regulation of cognition (ROC) (b) and influence ability to solve whole number addition and subtraction problems in contextual settings. A quasi-experimental group design was used with a sample of first-and third-grade participants. SRL strategies were embedded in daily problem-solving activities, including SRL checklists and self-questioning verbalizations. Pre/post, measures quantified ROC and whole number addition and subtraction responses. A two-way ANOVA was conducted to compare performance scores between treatment and comparison groups. The results indicate no differences in the overall performance of the study variables for grade one and grade three participants. The findings of this study and recommendations for further research will follow.

DOI

10.18122/td/1384/boisestate

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