Title

Outcomes Assessment Study Comparing High Schools Employing an Nataboc Certified Athletic Trainer with High Schools that Do Not Employ an NATABOC Certified Athletic Trainer

Publication Date

8-2000

Type of Culminating Activity

Thesis

Degree Title

Master of Science in Exercise and Sport Studies

Department

Kinesiology

Major Advisor

Ronald P. Pfeiffer

Advisor

Chad Harris

Advisor

John W. McChesney

Advisor

Thomas Koto

Abstract

In today’s health conscious society, most health care professions are evaluating their effectiveness as health care providers in order to provide the most financially efficient care possible. High school NATA Board of Certification Certified Athletic Trainers (ATCs) must examine their effectiveness in providing treatment to high school athletes, thus validating the money school districts budget for athletic training services. The National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) set its sights on research that validated patient functional outcomes and satisfaction. Webster (1995) stated that functional outcomes studies measure the patient’s physical, mental, and social well-being, as well as the patient’s perception of function and overall satisfaction. The NATA’s outcomes assessment questionnaire was developed to measure patient functional ability and satisfaction. The instrument was modified in order to compare injured high school athlete’s functional satisfaction in schools that employ teacher/ATCs to schools that do not employ such personnel. The sample (N=49) consisted of southwest Idaho high school (freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors) fall sports participants (football, volleyball, and cross-country). The high schools that employed ATCs were Boise, Eagle, and Meridian. The high schools that did not employ ATCs were Kuna, Emmett, Caldwell, Middleton, Horseshoe Bend, and Vallivue.

The purpose of the study was to determine if employing an ATC affects outcome assessments of injured athletes when compared to those of athletes at schools that do not have such personnel. The information obtained in this study could prove invaluable to school districts currently employing ATCs, school districts that are considering the employment of an ATC, school district legal firms, parents, student athletes, education associations, the NATA, and to future research in this area. Currently, there are no published studies in regards to treatment by an ATC showing a statistically significant difference, both at the time of the athlete’s initial injury, as well as, when the athlete returns to participation within the high school setting; as compared to high schools that do not employ an ATC.

Based on date of return data, there were no statistically significant differences between the ATC and non-ATC high schools; there were no statistically significant differences when the ATC provided greater than/less than 50% of the care to the injured athlete at the ATC school. There were statistically significant differences between the date of injury and date of return outcomes assessment scores from both the ATC and non-ATC schools. However, supporting data did indicate there was a significant difference in the date of injury scores between the ATC and non-ATC schools, and the difference between the date of return and date of injury scores was greater at the ATC schools.

In today’s health conscious society, most health care professions are evaluating their effectiveness as health care providers in order to provide the most financially efficient care possible. High school NATA Board of Certification Certified Athletic Trainers (ATCs) must examine their effectiveness in providing treatment to high school athletes, thus validating the money school districts budget for athletic training services. The National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) set its sights on research that validated patient functional outcomes and satisfaction. Webster (1995) stated that functional outcomes studies measure the patient’s physical, mental, and social well-being, as well as the patient’s perception of function and overall satisfaction. The NATA’s outcomes assessment questionnaire was developed to measure patient functional ability and satisfaction. The instrument was modified in order to compare injured high school athlete’s functional satisfaction in schools that employ teacher/ATCs to schools that do not employ such personnel. The sample (N=49) consisted of southwest Idaho high school (freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors) fall sports participants (football, volleyball, and cross-country). The high schools that employed ATCs were Boise, Eagle, and Meridian. The high schools that did not employ ATCs were Kuna, Emmett, Caldwell, Middleton, Horseshoe Bend, and Vallivue.

The purpose of the study was to determine if employing an ATC affects outcome assessments of injured athletes when compared to those of athletes at schools that do not have such personnel. The information obtained in this study could prove invaluable to school districts currently employing ATCs, school districts that are considering the employment of an ATC, school district legal firms, parents, student athletes, education associations, the NATA, and to future research in this area. Currently, there are no published studies in regards to treatment by an ATC showing a statistically significant difference, both at the time of the athlete’s initial injury, as well as, when the athlete returns to participation within the high school setting; as compared to high schools that do not employ an ATC.

Based on date of return data, there were no statistically significant differences between the ATC and non-ATC high schools; there were no statistically significant differences when the ATC provided greater than/less than 50% of the care to the injured athlete at the ATC school. There were statistically significant differences between the date of injury and date of return outcomes assessment scores from both the ATC and non-ATC schools. However, supporting data did indicate there was a significant difference in the date of injury scores between the ATC and non-ATC schools, and the difference between the date of return and date of injury scores was greater at the ATC schools.

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