Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-2020

Abstract

Recent work in political science demonstrates that the American public is strongly divided on partisan lines. Levels of affective polarization are so great, it seems, that partisanship even shapes behavior in apolitical settings. However, this literature does not account for other salient identity dimensions on which people make decisions in apolitical settings, potentially stacking the deck in favor of partisanship. We address this limitation with a pair of experiments studying price discrimination among college football fans. We find that partisan discrimination exists, even when the decision context explicitly calls attention to another social identity. But, importantly, this appears to function mostly as in-group favoritism rather than out-group hostility.

Copyright Statement

This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Political Behavior. The final authenticated version is available online at https://doi.org/10.1007/s11109-018-09519-4. The content of this document may vary from the final published version.

Available for download on Wednesday, September 01, 2021

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