Abstract Title

Perceptions of Environmentalism and Indigenous Peoples

Additional Funding Sources

The project described was supported by the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program through the U.S. Department of Education under Award No. P217A170273.

Abstract

Many Indigenous communities believe in a sibling bond with the Earth and all inhabitants; these relationships are not transactional, but rather, they are nurturing. However, many people lack an understanding of such practices. By looking at the historical environmental frameworks of Indigenous communities we can begin to understand how to better sustain all beings. The purpose of this study was to determine how people perceive environmentalism, Indigenous communities, education, and government action/inaction in hopes of identifying what could strengthen human bonds with the environment. Through a survey, I gathered fixed beliefs people have on environmental issues, connections to Indigenous communities, and environmentalism in education curricula. By conducting interviews, I was able to gather people’s further understandings on intergenerational knowledge of Indigenous Peoples’. Although most participants indicated there are environmental issues, many still are not clear on the positive interactions that are nurturing and sustainable between humans and the environment. This study solidifies the need for identifying Indigenous practices/strategies of nurturing the environment and the need to share this information in order to raise awareness and educate folks.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Perceptions of Environmentalism and Indigenous Peoples

Many Indigenous communities believe in a sibling bond with the Earth and all inhabitants; these relationships are not transactional, but rather, they are nurturing. However, many people lack an understanding of such practices. By looking at the historical environmental frameworks of Indigenous communities we can begin to understand how to better sustain all beings. The purpose of this study was to determine how people perceive environmentalism, Indigenous communities, education, and government action/inaction in hopes of identifying what could strengthen human bonds with the environment. Through a survey, I gathered fixed beliefs people have on environmental issues, connections to Indigenous communities, and environmentalism in education curricula. By conducting interviews, I was able to gather people’s further understandings on intergenerational knowledge of Indigenous Peoples’. Although most participants indicated there are environmental issues, many still are not clear on the positive interactions that are nurturing and sustainable between humans and the environment. This study solidifies the need for identifying Indigenous practices/strategies of nurturing the environment and the need to share this information in order to raise awareness and educate folks.