Abstract Title

Synthesis of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles for Lithium-Ion Batteries

Additional Funding Sources

The project described was supported by the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program through the U.S. Department of Education under Award No. P217A170273 and National Science Foundation Award No. DMR-1454984.

Abstract

The proliferation of mobile technology, such as smartphones and electric vehicles, has made lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) the most dominant energy source on the market. The most popular type of battery being the graphite-based LIB. It is favorable due to its high volumetric and gravimetric capacity in conjunction with its high cycle stability at room temperature. Although this type of battery is expected to continue to grow in popularity, some of the limitations it possesses are low charging rate, structural instability, and the reduction of capacity as a consequence of long-term cycling. The need to find suitable anode alternatives has prompted the investigation of titanium oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles as a possible replacement. What makes TiO2 a viable option is its high energy density, cycling stability, and low volume expansion during charging/discharging. Unfortunately, TiO2 suffers from a low theoretical capacity and slow transport kinetics for electrons and lithium-ions. This study investigates the role water plays in the electrochemical performance of anatase TiO2 in LIBs by annealing the material at different temperatures.

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Synthesis of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles for Lithium-Ion Batteries

The proliferation of mobile technology, such as smartphones and electric vehicles, has made lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) the most dominant energy source on the market. The most popular type of battery being the graphite-based LIB. It is favorable due to its high volumetric and gravimetric capacity in conjunction with its high cycle stability at room temperature. Although this type of battery is expected to continue to grow in popularity, some of the limitations it possesses are low charging rate, structural instability, and the reduction of capacity as a consequence of long-term cycling. The need to find suitable anode alternatives has prompted the investigation of titanium oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles as a possible replacement. What makes TiO2 a viable option is its high energy density, cycling stability, and low volume expansion during charging/discharging. Unfortunately, TiO2 suffers from a low theoretical capacity and slow transport kinetics for electrons and lithium-ions. This study investigates the role water plays in the electrochemical performance of anatase TiO2 in LIBs by annealing the material at different temperatures.