Abstract Title

Investigating the Correlation Between Immune Responses and Collagen Deposition in Lungs of Amphibole Asbestos-Exposed Mice Through the Use of Multiphoton Microscopy and Paraffin Tissue Embedding

Additional Funding Sources

The project described was supported by an Institutional Development Award (IDeA) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Grant No. P20GM103408.

Abstract

Asbestos are naturally occurring fibers found in rock outcroppings but also used in many commercial processes; therefore, exposures are both environmental and occupational. When inhaled, amphibole asbestos can lead to various health issues, such as cancers, autoimmune diseases, and pleural fibrosis (excess collagen deposition). Previous research in our lab has shown that anti-mesothelial cell autoantibodies (MCAAs) are produced following amphibole asbestos exposure and may be the driving force of collagen formation during fibrosis. In the present work, we are confirming the functional relationship between the presence of autoantibodies and presence of collagen deposition. We are using multiphoton microscopy to image lung samples from mice that have been exposed to different forms of amphibole asbestos (Libby amphibole or Arizona amphibole) and have shown MCAA production. We hypothesize that mice with MCAA will show higher collagen levels in the pleural tissue This research will allow for a better understanding of the role MCAA has in fibrosis development. This information could lead to fibrosis treatment strategies aimed at blocking MCAA function.

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Investigating the Correlation Between Immune Responses and Collagen Deposition in Lungs of Amphibole Asbestos-Exposed Mice Through the Use of Multiphoton Microscopy and Paraffin Tissue Embedding

Asbestos are naturally occurring fibers found in rock outcroppings but also used in many commercial processes; therefore, exposures are both environmental and occupational. When inhaled, amphibole asbestos can lead to various health issues, such as cancers, autoimmune diseases, and pleural fibrosis (excess collagen deposition). Previous research in our lab has shown that anti-mesothelial cell autoantibodies (MCAAs) are produced following amphibole asbestos exposure and may be the driving force of collagen formation during fibrosis. In the present work, we are confirming the functional relationship between the presence of autoantibodies and presence of collagen deposition. We are using multiphoton microscopy to image lung samples from mice that have been exposed to different forms of amphibole asbestos (Libby amphibole or Arizona amphibole) and have shown MCAA production. We hypothesize that mice with MCAA will show higher collagen levels in the pleural tissue This research will allow for a better understanding of the role MCAA has in fibrosis development. This information could lead to fibrosis treatment strategies aimed at blocking MCAA function.