Abstract Title

The Utility of Curcumin as a Regenerative Aid in the Invertebrate Amphioxus

Additional Funding Sources

This project is supported by a 2020-2021 STEM Undergraduate Research Grant from the Higher Education Research Council and an Institutional Development Award (IDeA) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Grant No. P20GM103408.

Abstract

The invertebrate amphioxus obtain the ability to regenerate their posterior tail end after damage or loss. To increase this rate of regeneration, the chemical compound curcumin was added to the experimental tank as it contains anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, and wound healing properties. For 4 weeks, 6 individuals in the control tank and 6 individuals in the curcumin tank were maintained at proper salinity and temperature, fed every 3 days, and photographed every 7 days to track growth. The results indicated there was no significant difference in growth between control and experimental groups, however trends of a higher mean growth can be seen in the experimental group.

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The Utility of Curcumin as a Regenerative Aid in the Invertebrate Amphioxus

The invertebrate amphioxus obtain the ability to regenerate their posterior tail end after damage or loss. To increase this rate of regeneration, the chemical compound curcumin was added to the experimental tank as it contains anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, and wound healing properties. For 4 weeks, 6 individuals in the control tank and 6 individuals in the curcumin tank were maintained at proper salinity and temperature, fed every 3 days, and photographed every 7 days to track growth. The results indicated there was no significant difference in growth between control and experimental groups, however trends of a higher mean growth can be seen in the experimental group.