Abstract Title

Effective Antimicrobial Agents in Chlorhexidine Gluconate 0.12% on Multiple Bacterial Species of the Mouth

Additional Funding Sources

This project is supported by a 2020-2021 STEM Undergraduate Research Grant from the Higher Education Research Council and an Institutional Development Award (IDeA) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Grant No. P20GM103408.

Abstract

Microorganisms pose many potential complications in fields of surgery, particularly oral surgery. This experiment was conducted to answer questions regarding microbes of the mouth, namely what can be done to limit bacterial species in an environment that is so heavily contaminated. The antimicrobial properties of a prescription mouth rinse, Chlorhexidine Gluconate 0.12%, was studied to determine its efficacy in combating the number of microbes that remain prevalent in the oral cavity after treatment. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus salivarius are two strains with high abundance in the oral cavity which were used in preliminary studies. Dose-dependence and species-dependence values were tested using two media types that could readily be mixed as a solid or a liquid broth (Tryptic Soy Agar/Broth and Brain Heart Infusion Agar/Broth). Microbial population growth was assessed using spectrophotometric methods using absorbance values as proxies for population size. This study determined that in the absence of Chlorhexidine Gluconate 0.12% there is a significant difference between most media types for bacterial growth among S. mutans and S. salivarius, except there was no difference between S. salivarius in Brain Heart Infusion and S. salivarius in Tryptic Soy Broth. The Chlorhexidine Gluconate 0.12% used to treat the bacteria, completely inhibited population growth. These results indicate that Chlorhexidine Gluconate 0.12% is an effective antimicrobial agent for oral surgery procedures.

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Effective Antimicrobial Agents in Chlorhexidine Gluconate 0.12% on Multiple Bacterial Species of the Mouth

Microorganisms pose many potential complications in fields of surgery, particularly oral surgery. This experiment was conducted to answer questions regarding microbes of the mouth, namely what can be done to limit bacterial species in an environment that is so heavily contaminated. The antimicrobial properties of a prescription mouth rinse, Chlorhexidine Gluconate 0.12%, was studied to determine its efficacy in combating the number of microbes that remain prevalent in the oral cavity after treatment. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus salivarius are two strains with high abundance in the oral cavity which were used in preliminary studies. Dose-dependence and species-dependence values were tested using two media types that could readily be mixed as a solid or a liquid broth (Tryptic Soy Agar/Broth and Brain Heart Infusion Agar/Broth). Microbial population growth was assessed using spectrophotometric methods using absorbance values as proxies for population size. This study determined that in the absence of Chlorhexidine Gluconate 0.12% there is a significant difference between most media types for bacterial growth among S. mutans and S. salivarius, except there was no difference between S. salivarius in Brain Heart Infusion and S. salivarius in Tryptic Soy Broth. The Chlorhexidine Gluconate 0.12% used to treat the bacteria, completely inhibited population growth. These results indicate that Chlorhexidine Gluconate 0.12% is an effective antimicrobial agent for oral surgery procedures.