Abstract Title

An Exploration of Nursing Students’ Perspective Regarding LGBTQ+ Health Care

Additional Funding Sources

This project is supported by a 2020-2021 STEM Undergraduate Research Grant from the Higher Education Research Council.

Abstract

When lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ+) individuals seek even basic care and information, health care professionals are often uncomfortable and ill equipped to address their unique issues and concerns, presenting another barrier for LGBTQ+ individuals to access proper and competent health care. Distributed to a highly ranked undergraduate nursing program, a survey was designed to describe nursing students’ perspective regarding their awareness, comfort, attitudes, and perception of formal training, identifying any patterns in their perspectives on training and treating LBGTQ+ people. While 100% of participants agreed that it is a nurse’s responsibility to provide health care for LGBTQ+ patients and equitable health care, gay and bisexual participants were more likely to agree to statements that suggest awareness (p < 0.00687). Furthermore, 71.4% (n =21) of participants said they are interested in receiving future education at LCSC about LGBTQ+ health issues. Ultimately, this data supports future research with nursing students in the form of a focus group and interviews to evaluate the challenges and discrepancies of their training and perceptions, leading to the development of a more informed education.

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An Exploration of Nursing Students’ Perspective Regarding LGBTQ+ Health Care

When lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ+) individuals seek even basic care and information, health care professionals are often uncomfortable and ill equipped to address their unique issues and concerns, presenting another barrier for LGBTQ+ individuals to access proper and competent health care. Distributed to a highly ranked undergraduate nursing program, a survey was designed to describe nursing students’ perspective regarding their awareness, comfort, attitudes, and perception of formal training, identifying any patterns in their perspectives on training and treating LBGTQ+ people. While 100% of participants agreed that it is a nurse’s responsibility to provide health care for LGBTQ+ patients and equitable health care, gay and bisexual participants were more likely to agree to statements that suggest awareness (p < 0.00687). Furthermore, 71.4% (n =21) of participants said they are interested in receiving future education at LCSC about LGBTQ+ health issues. Ultimately, this data supports future research with nursing students in the form of a focus group and interviews to evaluate the challenges and discrepancies of their training and perceptions, leading to the development of a more informed education.