Abstract Title

An Analysis of the Different Layers of Inclusive Research

Additional Funding Sources

This research was supported by Boise State University.

Abstract

The work presented here is a component of a larger study to measure glyphosate exposure among pregnant women in rural regions of Idaho. Glyphosate is weed killer, and in the last two decades has become the single most commonly used agricultural chemical in the world. At the same time, emerging research indicates that glyphosate exposure during pregnancy may be associated with adverse health outcomes, such as pre-term birth. The overarching aim of our larger study is to understand whether and how pregnant women in Idaho may be exposed to glyphosate. The overall population of interest in that study are all pregnant women in Idaho who live in agricultural regions, and our study population therefore includes both Spanish- and English-speaking women, to reflect that overall population of interest. The purpose of presenting this particular component of this study is to provide a better understanding of what it means to do inclusive research and what we, as researchers, can do to improve our ability to conduct inclusive research. For example, translating documents is not enough if the documents are not going to be culturally appropriate. In addition, researchers may have to think about their protocols and if there may have to be multiple protocols with different explanations. I suggest that researchers think about their methodologies and how accessible and inclusive are they for the communities they are wanting to research.

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An Analysis of the Different Layers of Inclusive Research

The work presented here is a component of a larger study to measure glyphosate exposure among pregnant women in rural regions of Idaho. Glyphosate is weed killer, and in the last two decades has become the single most commonly used agricultural chemical in the world. At the same time, emerging research indicates that glyphosate exposure during pregnancy may be associated with adverse health outcomes, such as pre-term birth. The overarching aim of our larger study is to understand whether and how pregnant women in Idaho may be exposed to glyphosate. The overall population of interest in that study are all pregnant women in Idaho who live in agricultural regions, and our study population therefore includes both Spanish- and English-speaking women, to reflect that overall population of interest. The purpose of presenting this particular component of this study is to provide a better understanding of what it means to do inclusive research and what we, as researchers, can do to improve our ability to conduct inclusive research. For example, translating documents is not enough if the documents are not going to be culturally appropriate. In addition, researchers may have to think about their protocols and if there may have to be multiple protocols with different explanations. I suggest that researchers think about their methodologies and how accessible and inclusive are they for the communities they are wanting to research.