Abstract Title

Musculoskeletal Adaptations in Younger and Older Adults in Response to Challenging Conditions

Additional Funding Sources

This project is supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (Award No. R25GM123927) and the National Institute on Aging (Award No. R15AG059655) of the National Institutes of Health.

Abstract

Accidental falls are the leading cause of injury in adults 65 years and older. Previous research has identified significant fall factors including cognitive distractions, environmental conditions, and physical impairments while current research is aimed on gaining a higher understanding of how the musculoskeletal system responds to these factors. We hypothesize that older adults who have experienced an accidental fall will have altered biomechanics during activities of daily living resulting in a stiffer knee and higher compressive load across the knee joint. Via computational modeling and medical imaging analysis, we aim to understand the correlation between knee stability and overall musculoskeletal function. This will enable us to work towards personalized treatment recommendations for improved joint stability including rehabilitation, orthotic development, or surgery intervention.

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Musculoskeletal Adaptations in Younger and Older Adults in Response to Challenging Conditions

Accidental falls are the leading cause of injury in adults 65 years and older. Previous research has identified significant fall factors including cognitive distractions, environmental conditions, and physical impairments while current research is aimed on gaining a higher understanding of how the musculoskeletal system responds to these factors. We hypothesize that older adults who have experienced an accidental fall will have altered biomechanics during activities of daily living resulting in a stiffer knee and higher compressive load across the knee joint. Via computational modeling and medical imaging analysis, we aim to understand the correlation between knee stability and overall musculoskeletal function. This will enable us to work towards personalized treatment recommendations for improved joint stability including rehabilitation, orthotic development, or surgery intervention.