Abstract Title

Additive Manufacturing of Piezoelectric Devices

Additional Funding Sources

The project described was supported by the National Science Foundation via the Research Experience for Undergraduates Site: Materials for Society (Award Nos. DMR 1658076 and 1950305) and by Boise State University.

Abstract

This research focused on the use of barium titanate (BTO) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a piezoelectric 3D printer ink. These materials were chosen specifically for their properties; BTO compares with lead zirconate titanate, which is not the best environmental material to use. The use of BTO and PVDF allow for biocompatible applications, so there is a wider range of demand for this material in the biomedical field. To determine the best composition for the ink, many different weight percentages of barium titanate as well as polyvinylidene fluoride were used. To make these inks, a solvent is needed to fully dissolve the powders of BTO and PVDF. Once the ink was prepared, it would be printed and tested to determine the material properties. These inks could be used in a variety of different applications such as capacitors, sensors, and synthetic skin. The hope for this research is to soon be able to use these inks in the applications and test their functionality.

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Additive Manufacturing of Piezoelectric Devices

This research focused on the use of barium titanate (BTO) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a piezoelectric 3D printer ink. These materials were chosen specifically for their properties; BTO compares with lead zirconate titanate, which is not the best environmental material to use. The use of BTO and PVDF allow for biocompatible applications, so there is a wider range of demand for this material in the biomedical field. To determine the best composition for the ink, many different weight percentages of barium titanate as well as polyvinylidene fluoride were used. To make these inks, a solvent is needed to fully dissolve the powders of BTO and PVDF. Once the ink was prepared, it would be printed and tested to determine the material properties. These inks could be used in a variety of different applications such as capacitors, sensors, and synthetic skin. The hope for this research is to soon be able to use these inks in the applications and test their functionality.