Abstract Title

The Use of Acetyl Bromide Lignin Extraction in Different Plant Sources

Additional Funding Sources

This project was made possible by the NSF Idaho EPSCoR Program and by the National Science Foundation under Award No. OIA-1757324.

Abstract

Lignins are the second most abundant organic polymers in most plants that provide both structural rigidity and defense against diseases. Lignins play a complex role in organic matter (C) decomposition in nature contributing to the amount of C that accumulates in soil. Lignins are complex macromolecular phenolic structures, which often hinder microbial decomposition. Wood, for example, is rich in lignin and may take 10-100+ years to decompose. Determining the amount of lignin present in litter materials from different plant species will help to improve understanding of organic matter decomposition and soil C accumulation. However, the current methods of determining lignin content are less than satisfactory. This project aims to develop a reliable method of determining the lignin content in different plant species. Utilizing information from the current literature, we have developed a straightforward method that has been applied to analyze sage litter, peach leaves, and branches. The method provides consistent data and has the potential to be applied to a variety of plant samples.

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The Use of Acetyl Bromide Lignin Extraction in Different Plant Sources

Lignins are the second most abundant organic polymers in most plants that provide both structural rigidity and defense against diseases. Lignins play a complex role in organic matter (C) decomposition in nature contributing to the amount of C that accumulates in soil. Lignins are complex macromolecular phenolic structures, which often hinder microbial decomposition. Wood, for example, is rich in lignin and may take 10-100+ years to decompose. Determining the amount of lignin present in litter materials from different plant species will help to improve understanding of organic matter decomposition and soil C accumulation. However, the current methods of determining lignin content are less than satisfactory. This project aims to develop a reliable method of determining the lignin content in different plant species. Utilizing information from the current literature, we have developed a straightforward method that has been applied to analyze sage litter, peach leaves, and branches. The method provides consistent data and has the potential to be applied to a variety of plant samples.