Abstract Title

Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Boron Nitride Thin Films

Additional Funding Sources

This project was suported by an Idaho State University Career Path Internship and ISU CAES (Center for Advanced Energy Studies) Internal Seed Grant.

Abstract

Hexagonal boron nitride is a beneficial coating material as it has been found to have properties exhibiting anti-corrosion and thermal and chemical stability. Specifically, boron nitrides anti-corrosive properties would be a beneficial coating material on nuclear reactant cooling pipes as they are prone to corrosion. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is a process in which gasses are fed into a chamber via separate channels at relatively low temperatures to react via radiofrequency plasma along with direct current power to create a solid thin film deposited onto a substrate. Boron nitride thin films have been made using the PECVD process at temperatures around 600° C using N, H, and BCl3 gasses. In attempt to recreate that outcome, N, H, and BCl3 gasses were used under depositions set at lower temperatures, 100-150° C, using silicon wafers as the substrate. The thin films were analyzed for thickness via profilometry, and for film content using infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Based on the results, boron nitride, boric acid, and ammonium chloride may be present in the resulting deposited films.

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Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Boron Nitride Thin Films

Hexagonal boron nitride is a beneficial coating material as it has been found to have properties exhibiting anti-corrosion and thermal and chemical stability. Specifically, boron nitrides anti-corrosive properties would be a beneficial coating material on nuclear reactant cooling pipes as they are prone to corrosion. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is a process in which gasses are fed into a chamber via separate channels at relatively low temperatures to react via radiofrequency plasma along with direct current power to create a solid thin film deposited onto a substrate. Boron nitride thin films have been made using the PECVD process at temperatures around 600° C using N, H, and BCl3 gasses. In attempt to recreate that outcome, N, H, and BCl3 gasses were used under depositions set at lower temperatures, 100-150° C, using silicon wafers as the substrate. The thin films were analyzed for thickness via profilometry, and for film content using infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Based on the results, boron nitride, boric acid, and ammonium chloride may be present in the resulting deposited films.