Abstract Title

Biocompatability of Magnetostrictive Compounds

Additional Funding Sources

This project is supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award No. R25GM123927.

Abstract

Bone loss due to chronic illness, trauma, or microgravity environments requires novel countermeasures. Bioreactors such as Low Intensity vibration (LIV) platforms have been shown to encourage mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation into bone tissue through mechanical strain. These devices can be costly and require meticulous design. Magnetostrictive compounds which utilize magnetic energy to stimulate similar mechanical strain as the devices previously described, could be 3-D printable materials to directly apply strain to the scaffold. However, the biocompatibility or cytotoxic effects of these compounds have not been explored. Here we tested the biocompatibility of magnetostrictive compounds cobalt ferrite and Terfenol-D. Magnetostrictive compounds in 3-D printed scaffolds could provide cost effective wireless methods for bone tissue engineering eliminating the need for other costly devices.

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Biocompatability of Magnetostrictive Compounds

Bone loss due to chronic illness, trauma, or microgravity environments requires novel countermeasures. Bioreactors such as Low Intensity vibration (LIV) platforms have been shown to encourage mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation into bone tissue through mechanical strain. These devices can be costly and require meticulous design. Magnetostrictive compounds which utilize magnetic energy to stimulate similar mechanical strain as the devices previously described, could be 3-D printable materials to directly apply strain to the scaffold. However, the biocompatibility or cytotoxic effects of these compounds have not been explored. Here we tested the biocompatibility of magnetostrictive compounds cobalt ferrite and Terfenol-D. Magnetostrictive compounds in 3-D printed scaffolds could provide cost effective wireless methods for bone tissue engineering eliminating the need for other costly devices.