Abstract Title

Specific Conductivity Along Intermittent and Ephemeral Streams in Southeastern Idaho

Abstract

Fine-scale spatial variations among headwater streams can influence both local and large scale aquatic ecosystems. Currently we are documenting spatial and temporal variations in stream electrical conductivity as well as temperature along intermittent streams and ephemeral tributaries throughout the Gibson Jack watershed in southeastern Idaho, USA. Measurements are taken every 50 meters from the outlet of the stream located at the City of Pocatello’s water intake facility. Stream specific conductivity, temperature, spatial coordinates, as well as a picture and description are all documented at every site. Each sample will be taken twice over the course of the summer, once during high flow, again during low flow. The motivation behind this research is to quantify potential correlations between specific conductivity, and environmental processes that dictate stream responses to drought. Preliminary data indicates that small tributaries closer to the headwater have significantly lower conductivity than the mainstream. We hypothesize that variations in conductivity will be significantly lower than in low flow than during high flow. The information being gathered has the potential for us to better understand sources of water in the watershed and potential sensitivity of the aquatic habitat to drought.

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COinS
 

Specific Conductivity Along Intermittent and Ephemeral Streams in Southeastern Idaho

Fine-scale spatial variations among headwater streams can influence both local and large scale aquatic ecosystems. Currently we are documenting spatial and temporal variations in stream electrical conductivity as well as temperature along intermittent streams and ephemeral tributaries throughout the Gibson Jack watershed in southeastern Idaho, USA. Measurements are taken every 50 meters from the outlet of the stream located at the City of Pocatello’s water intake facility. Stream specific conductivity, temperature, spatial coordinates, as well as a picture and description are all documented at every site. Each sample will be taken twice over the course of the summer, once during high flow, again during low flow. The motivation behind this research is to quantify potential correlations between specific conductivity, and environmental processes that dictate stream responses to drought. Preliminary data indicates that small tributaries closer to the headwater have significantly lower conductivity than the mainstream. We hypothesize that variations in conductivity will be significantly lower than in low flow than during high flow. The information being gathered has the potential for us to better understand sources of water in the watershed and potential sensitivity of the aquatic habitat to drought.