Title

A Report on the Peregrine Falcon Cross-Fostering Experiment in the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area, Boise, Idaho, Summer, 1977

Document Type

NCA Publications/Reports

Publication Date

7-25-1977

Page Numbers

27

Abstract

This report summarizes the activities of the Peregrine Falcon cross-fostering experiment in the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area near Boise, Idaho, during the summer of 1977. Although the Snake River provides some marsh type habitat, most of the area is typical desert were sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and Greasewood (Sarocbatus vermiculatus) are the major vegetation. There is an abundance of volcanic rock and rodents, therefore supporting a large nesting population of raptors. However, the avian prey base for raptors is marginal.

The eyrie is one hundred yards from the Snake River located on a thirty foot volcanic rock ledge facing east, while the river is running from east to west. The scrape itself is located about fifteen feet from the bottom of the cliff.

On May 12, 1977, three thirteen-day-old captive-bred Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus anatum ) were placed in a Prarie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) eyrie immediately following the removal of the Prairie Falcon young. The Prairie Falcon young were fostered into neighboring prairie eyries by the Bureau of Land Management personnel. All three peregrines were males with identification numbers of PB1,3; PB1,5; and Y1,2.

Nell Newman and I tended the station from May 8, 1977 to July 14, 1977, and made continual observation from dusk to dawn. Observations were made through 10 X 50 binoculars, and a 25X powered spotting scope.

This report consists of three sections: Section I is composed of a summary of the pre-fledging developments and fledging; Section II consists of a summary of the post-fledging developments; and Section III contains comments, an evaluation, and suggestions concerning the Peregrine Falcon cross-fostering experiment in the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area.

Comments

Unpublished Report, Peregrine Fund of Cornell University, Ft. Collins, Co.

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A Report on the Peregrine Falcon Cross-Fostering Experiment in the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area, Boise, Idaho, Summer, 1977

This report summarizes the activities of the Peregrine Falcon cross-fostering experiment in the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area near Boise, Idaho, during the summer of 1977. Although the Snake River provides some marsh type habitat, most of the area is typical desert were sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and Greasewood (Sarocbatus vermiculatus) are the major vegetation. There is an abundance of volcanic rock and rodents, therefore supporting a large nesting population of raptors. However, the avian prey base for raptors is marginal.

The eyrie is one hundred yards from the Snake River located on a thirty foot volcanic rock ledge facing east, while the river is running from east to west. The scrape itself is located about fifteen feet from the bottom of the cliff.

On May 12, 1977, three thirteen-day-old captive-bred Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus anatum ) were placed in a Prarie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) eyrie immediately following the removal of the Prairie Falcon young. The Prairie Falcon young were fostered into neighboring prairie eyries by the Bureau of Land Management personnel. All three peregrines were males with identification numbers of PB1,3; PB1,5; and Y1,2.

Nell Newman and I tended the station from May 8, 1977 to July 14, 1977, and made continual observation from dusk to dawn. Observations were made through 10 X 50 binoculars, and a 25X powered spotting scope.

This report consists of three sections: Section I is composed of a summary of the pre-fledging developments and fledging; Section II consists of a summary of the post-fledging developments; and Section III contains comments, an evaluation, and suggestions concerning the Peregrine Falcon cross-fostering experiment in the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area.