Title

A Grazing History of Southwestern Idaho with Emphasis on the Birds of Prey Study Area

Document Type

NCA Publications/Reports

Publication Date

8-1-1982

Journal Title/Publication Source

Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior

Page Numbers

1-82

Abstract

The semiarid rangelands of southwestern Idaho have been grazed by the livestock of man since about 1700, when the Shoshonis brought the first horses into the northern Great Basin. Since 1870, much of this area has been grazed intensively by cattle, sheep and horses.

Grazing, drought, fire and the invasion of the range by exotic annual plants, have brought about important changes in the character of the southwestern Idaho range. Most of this rangeland is presently subject to grazing under modern practices of range management. Intelligent management of the area requires insight into the pristine condition and productivity of the range in presettlement times, and knowledge of the history of grazing in the area since 1700--the grazing practices employed, the varying condition of the range and the changing character of the vegetation.

This paper represents a gathering of information concerning the grazing history of southwestern Idaho, with special emphasis upon the Snake River Birds of Prey Study Area adjacent to the Snake River canyon (Map 1).

Comments

Snake River Birds of Prey Research Project Representing Boise, ID

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

A Grazing History of Southwestern Idaho with Emphasis on the Birds of Prey Study Area

The semiarid rangelands of southwestern Idaho have been grazed by the livestock of man since about 1700, when the Shoshonis brought the first horses into the northern Great Basin. Since 1870, much of this area has been grazed intensively by cattle, sheep and horses.

Grazing, drought, fire and the invasion of the range by exotic annual plants, have brought about important changes in the character of the southwestern Idaho range. Most of this rangeland is presently subject to grazing under modern practices of range management. Intelligent management of the area requires insight into the pristine condition and productivity of the range in presettlement times, and knowledge of the history of grazing in the area since 1700--the grazing practices employed, the varying condition of the range and the changing character of the vegetation.

This paper represents a gathering of information concerning the grazing history of southwestern Idaho, with special emphasis upon the Snake River Birds of Prey Study Area adjacent to the Snake River canyon (Map 1).