Title

Research Methods for Psychophysiological Deception Detection

Document Type

Contribution to Books

Publication Date

1-1-2011

Abstract

For purposes of this chapter, we accept Vrij's (2000) definition of deception as "a successful or unsuccessful deliberate attempt, without forewarning, to create in another a belief which the communicator considers to be untrue" (p.6). Deception is a ubiquitous human behavior. DePaulo and her colleagues (DePaulo & Kashy, 1998; DePaulo, Kashy, Kirkendol, Wyer, & Epstein, 1996; Kashy & Depaulo, 1996) studied deception in naturalistic settings and found that during interpersonal interactions of 10 minutes or longer, people lied on average twice a day. Deception is used in quarter of interactions with others, and on average, a person lies to 34% of the people interacted with during an average week. Robinson, Shepherd, and Heywood (1998) reported that 83% of the university undergraduates surveyed said they would like to get a job.

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