Title

Treasure Valley Idaho Status Quo Projection Shapefiles for 2010, 2020, 2030 and 2040

Summary & Purpose

The Treasure Valley Alternative Futures Project is a component of the National Science Foundation’s EPSCoR Grant: Managing Idaho’s Landscapes for Ecosystem Services (MILES), which has provided a statewide five year grant to Boise State University, Idaho State University and University of Idaho. The Treasure Valley’s changing environment and community impact the landscape and with this data set, predicting the population growth, LULC and water availability over the next 30 years is possible. With this particular data set, we see data that was collected in 2010 for a status quo scenario. In a status quo scenario, a maintained allocation distribution is kept the same as it was in 2010. As seen in the data set from 2010 to 2040, little has changed in LULC and population density spread out westwards. This research has built a framework for the alternative studies in the Treasure Valley and can serve as a good start for more detailed future studies.

Funding Citation

This publication was made possible by the NSF Idaho EPSCoR Program and by the National Science Foundation under award number IIA-1301792.

Data Source Credits

National Land Cover Database 2011

Single Dataset or Series?

Series

Data Format

ESRI ArcGIS/10.1 Shapefile

Data Attributes

This data set was collected under the Treasure Valley Alternative Futures Project and is furthering our understanding of how Idaho’s landscapes will change in the future under certain scenarios that might be taken. Environmental (i.e. climate) and social (i.e. population) factors are two driving changes that alter landscapes and their associated social systems. Using the Envision tool scenarios including managed growth, unconstrained growth and status quo were created and projected over the course of 30 years to show the changes under these predetermined circumstances. This data set proves that integrated modeling work can provide sufficient spatial and temporal details, and sufficiently capture some important factors of landscape change to provide useful insights into possible alternative future scenarios for the Treasure Valley. Land use and land cover categories from different level WATER 11:Open Water - areas of open water, generally with less than 25% cover of vegetation or soil. 12:Perennial Ice/Snow - areas characterized by a perennial cover of ice and/or snow, generally greater than 25% of total cover. DEVELOPED 21:Developed, Open Space - areas with a mixture of some constructed materials, but mostly vegetation in the form of lawn grasses. Impervious surfaces account for less than 20% of total cover. These areas most commonly include large-lot single-family housing units, parks, golf courses, and vegetation planted in developed settings for recreation, erosion control, or aesthetic purposes. 22:Developed, Low Intensity - areas with a mixture of constructed materials and vegetation. Impervious surfaces account for 20% to 49% percent of total cover. These areas most commonly include single-family housing units. 23:Developed, Medium Intensity – areas with a mixture of constructed materials and vegetation. Impervious surfaces account for 50% to 79% of the total cover. These areas most commonly include single-family housing units. 23:Developed High Intensity -highly developed areas where people reside or work in high numbers. Examples include apartment complexes, row houses and commercial/industrial. Impervious surfaces account for 80% to 100% of the total cover. BARREN 31:Barren Land (Rock/Sand/Clay) - areas of bedrock, desert pavement, scarps, talus, slides, volcanic material, glacial debris, sand dunes, strip mines, gravel pits and other accumulations of earthen material. Generally, vegetation accounts for less than 15% of total cover. FOREST 41:Deciduous Forest - areas dominated by trees generally greater than 5 meters tall, and greater than 20% of total vegetation cover. More than 75% of the tree species shed foliage simultaneously in response to seasonal change. 42:Evergreen Forest - areas dominated by trees generally greater than 5 meters tall, and greater than 20% of total vegetation cover. More than 75% of the tree species maintain their leaves all year. Canopy is never without green foliage. 43:Mixed Forest - areas dominated by trees generally greater than 5 meters tall, and greater than 20% of total vegetation cover. Neither deciduous nor evergreen species are greater than 75% of total tree cover. SHRUBLAND 51:Dwarf Scrub - Alaska only areas dominated by shrubs less than 20 centimeters tall with shrub canopy typically greater than 20% of total vegetation. This type is often co-associated with grasses, sedges, herbs, and non-vascular vegetation. 52:Shrub/Scrub - areas dominated by shrubs; less than 5 meters tall with shrub canopy typically greater than 20% of total vegetation. This class includes true shrubs, young trees in an early successional stage or trees stunted from environmental conditions. HERBACEOUS 71:Grassland/Herbaceous - areas dominated by gramanoid or herbaceous vegetation, generally greater than 80% of total vegetation. These areas are not subject to intensive management such as tilling, but can be utilized for grazing. 72:Sedge/Herbaceous - Alaska only areas dominated by sedges and forbs, generally greater than 80% of total vegetation. This type can occur with significant other grasses or other grass like plants, and includes sedge tundra, and sedge tussock tundra. 73:Lichens - Alaska only areas dominated by fruticose or foliose lichens generally greater than 80% of total vegetation. 74:Moss - Alaska only areas dominated by mosses, generally greater than 80% of total vegetation. PLANTED/CULTIVATED 81:Pasture/Hay – areas of grasses, legumes, or grass-legume mixtures planted for livestock grazing or the production of seed or hay crops, typically on a perennial cycle. Pasture/hay vegetation accounts for greater than 20% of total vegetation. 82:Cultivated Crops – areas used for the production of annual crops, such as corn, soybeans, vegetables, tobacco, and cotton, and also perennial woody crops such as orchards and vineyards. Crop vegetation accounts for greater than 20% of total vegetation. This class also includes all land being actively tilled. WETLANDS 90:Woody Wetlands - areas where forest or shrubland vegetation accounts for greater than 20% of vegetative cover and the soil or substrate is periodically saturated with or covered with water. 95:Emergent Herbaceous Wetlands - Areas where perennial herbaceous vegetation accounts for greater than 80% of vegetative cover and the soil or substrate is periodically saturated with or covered with water. Anderson Land Cover Classification System.

Map Area

44.003246, 43.142594

Map Area

-115.867866, -117.066686

Map Area Coordinate System

GCS_North_American_1983 projected to NAD_1983_UTM_Zone_11

Time Period

2010 through 2040

Update Frequency

Other

Privacy and Confidentiality Statement

We are explicitly compliant with federal and state laws surrounding data privacy including the protection of personal financial information through the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, personal medical information through HIPAA, HITECH and other regulations. All human subject data (e.g., surveys) has been collected and managed only by personnel with adequate human subject protection certification.

Use Restrictions

Data will be provided to all who agree to appropriately acknowledge the National Science Foundation (NSF), Idaho EPSCoR and the individual investigators responsible for the data set. By downloading these data and using them to produce further analysis and/or products, users agree to appropriately acknowledge the National Science Foundation (NSF), Idaho EPSCoR and the individual investigators responsible for the data set. Use constraints: Acceptable uses of data provided by Idaho EPSCoR include any academic, research, educational, governmental, recreational, or other not-for-profit activities. Any use of data provided by the Idaho EPSCoR must acknowledge Idaho EPSCoR and the funding source(s) that contributed to the collection of the data. Users are expected to inform the Idaho EPSCoR Office and the PI(s) responsible for the data of any work or publications based on data provided.

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