Abstract

Wireless sensor communication can evaluate the structural integrity of a system while reducing the danger and cost of installation and maintenance on satellites. This is needed at the International Space Station as well as other satellites. The objective of this mission is to perform a demonstration using backscatter Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Tag technology as a method of wireless communication in extremely low earth orbit. While RFID tag communication has been used on earth for many practical applications the technology has yet to be tested in space. A 3U Cubesat was selected as the configuration to house the experiment. This project utilizes an electrical power system, an interface board custom built around a microcontroller, and two radio communication systems to run the RFID experiment to be designed by a Georgia Tech engineering team. The RFID tag will be mounted to a carbon fiber boom that can be extended out one meter to incrementally collect data. This satellite will need to be strong enough to pass a series of vibration and heat tests to be qualified for flight. It will be programmed to maintain its own power, take data, and communicate the data back to earth via the Globalstar Network.

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Radio Frequency Tag Satellite: Backscatter Communication in Low Earth Orbit

Wireless sensor communication can evaluate the structural integrity of a system while reducing the danger and cost of installation and maintenance on satellites. This is needed at the International Space Station as well as other satellites. The objective of this mission is to perform a demonstration using backscatter Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Tag technology as a method of wireless communication in extremely low earth orbit. While RFID tag communication has been used on earth for many practical applications the technology has yet to be tested in space. A 3U Cubesat was selected as the configuration to house the experiment. This project utilizes an electrical power system, an interface board custom built around a microcontroller, and two radio communication systems to run the RFID experiment to be designed by a Georgia Tech engineering team. The RFID tag will be mounted to a carbon fiber boom that can be extended out one meter to incrementally collect data. This satellite will need to be strong enough to pass a series of vibration and heat tests to be qualified for flight. It will be programmed to maintain its own power, take data, and communicate the data back to earth via the Globalstar Network.