Abstract

Optical microscopy uses the interactions between light and materials to provide images of the microscopic world. It is widely employed in science to study the behavior and properties of microscopic organisms and cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique for obtaining images of the surfaces of materials at the atomic to micrometer scales. AFM operates by rastering an ultra-sharp needle across a sample surface and recording the height of the needle at each position. While AFM can provide atomic resolution images of the contours (topography) of a surface, it can also perform extremely sensitive measurements of surface mechanical properties. By fabricating custom AFM probes, the mechanical properties of specific locations of living cells can be studied and manipulated. In addition, high-speed imaging of biological materials can provide images of changes to cellular surfaces in response to chemical or electrical signals. This poster will present examples and applications of advanced AFM capabilities for research in biomaterials available in the Boise State University Surface Science Laboratory.

Share

COinS
 

Advanced Atomic Force Microscopy for BioMaterials Research

Optical microscopy uses the interactions between light and materials to provide images of the microscopic world. It is widely employed in science to study the behavior and properties of microscopic organisms and cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique for obtaining images of the surfaces of materials at the atomic to micrometer scales. AFM operates by rastering an ultra-sharp needle across a sample surface and recording the height of the needle at each position. While AFM can provide atomic resolution images of the contours (topography) of a surface, it can also perform extremely sensitive measurements of surface mechanical properties. By fabricating custom AFM probes, the mechanical properties of specific locations of living cells can be studied and manipulated. In addition, high-speed imaging of biological materials can provide images of changes to cellular surfaces in response to chemical or electrical signals. This poster will present examples and applications of advanced AFM capabilities for research in biomaterials available in the Boise State University Surface Science Laboratory.