Abstract

Recent advances in the efficiency of hybrid perovskite solar cells have motivated extensive research aimed at increasing their stability with respect to environmental factors like humidity and light. It is known that altering the chemistry of the perovskite crystal can alter the lattice structure, which in turn can affect properties of the cell, including stability. In order to fabricate more stable methylammonium lead (II) iodide (MAPbI3) cells, a series of precursor solutions was created by substituting increasing amounts of lead (II) thiocyanate (SCN) for lead (II) iodide following the stoichiometric form MAPbI(3-x)(SCN)x. Power-conversion efficiencies of resultant cells were obtained under illumination to fit an Arrhenius decomposition curve. The most stable cells were fabricated from the precursor solution where x = R. X-Ray diffractometry was used to elucidate the changes in the crystal lattices, and the most stable cells had the most tetragonal lattice character.

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Fabricating Stable Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells

Recent advances in the efficiency of hybrid perovskite solar cells have motivated extensive research aimed at increasing their stability with respect to environmental factors like humidity and light. It is known that altering the chemistry of the perovskite crystal can alter the lattice structure, which in turn can affect properties of the cell, including stability. In order to fabricate more stable methylammonium lead (II) iodide (MAPbI3) cells, a series of precursor solutions was created by substituting increasing amounts of lead (II) thiocyanate (SCN) for lead (II) iodide following the stoichiometric form MAPbI(3-x)(SCN)x. Power-conversion efficiencies of resultant cells were obtained under illumination to fit an Arrhenius decomposition curve. The most stable cells were fabricated from the precursor solution where x = R. X-Ray diffractometry was used to elucidate the changes in the crystal lattices, and the most stable cells had the most tetragonal lattice character.