Abstract Title

The Relationship between Nonverbal Mirroring and Reciprocal Self-Disclosure

Disciplines

Interpersonal and Small Group Communication | Other Communication

Abstract

Previous research has shown a relationship between intentional nonverbal mirroring behaviors and increased likeability, particularly for children. The purpose of this study will be to examine the hypothesis that increased intentional nonverbal mirroring behaviors is linked with increased self-disclosure within a young adult population. Participants in this experiment will be drawn from a private, northwestern university and will range in age from 18-25 years. A modified version of Jourard’s Sixty-Item Self-Disclosure Questionnaire will be used to gather data through the use of neutral questions seeking to expose differing levels of self-disclosure in the participants. Data will be analyzed through a t-test to determine the differences in self-disclosure between the experimental and control group. If the hypothesis in this study is confirmed, this will lead to a new branch of bridging nonverbal communication behaviors with larger theoretical frameworks such as Social Penetration Theory.

Comments

Poster #Th36

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The Relationship between Nonverbal Mirroring and Reciprocal Self-Disclosure

Previous research has shown a relationship between intentional nonverbal mirroring behaviors and increased likeability, particularly for children. The purpose of this study will be to examine the hypothesis that increased intentional nonverbal mirroring behaviors is linked with increased self-disclosure within a young adult population. Participants in this experiment will be drawn from a private, northwestern university and will range in age from 18-25 years. A modified version of Jourard’s Sixty-Item Self-Disclosure Questionnaire will be used to gather data through the use of neutral questions seeking to expose differing levels of self-disclosure in the participants. Data will be analyzed through a t-test to determine the differences in self-disclosure between the experimental and control group. If the hypothesis in this study is confirmed, this will lead to a new branch of bridging nonverbal communication behaviors with larger theoretical frameworks such as Social Penetration Theory.