Abstract Title

Characterization of Inkjet-Printed Features for Electronic Applications

Disciplines

Electronic Devices and Semiconductor Manufacturing | Nanoscience and Nanotechnology | Nanotechnology Fabrication | Other Materials Science and Engineering

Abstract

Printed electronics, a form of additive manufacturing, is a growing field because it uses less energy, fewer raw materials, and produces less waste than traditional electronics manufacturing. In this study, electronic features were inkjet printed using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2831 printer. Silver nanoink from Novacentrix and metallic carbon nanotube ink from NanoIntergris were the conductive materials. Shapes such as line and bridge resistors were printed on polyimide (flexible plastic) substrates. After printing, the shapes were annealed at temperatures less than 200 °C to sinter the silver and evaporate remaining solvents. After processing, all features were characterized using optical microscopy for resolution, profilometry for thickness, and electrical testing for resistivity. This study showed favorable results amongst thin lines widely spaced apart and thick bridge resistors.

Comments

Poster #Th30

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Characterization of Inkjet-Printed Features for Electronic Applications

Printed electronics, a form of additive manufacturing, is a growing field because it uses less energy, fewer raw materials, and produces less waste than traditional electronics manufacturing. In this study, electronic features were inkjet printed using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2831 printer. Silver nanoink from Novacentrix and metallic carbon nanotube ink from NanoIntergris were the conductive materials. Shapes such as line and bridge resistors were printed on polyimide (flexible plastic) substrates. After printing, the shapes were annealed at temperatures less than 200 °C to sinter the silver and evaporate remaining solvents. After processing, all features were characterized using optical microscopy for resolution, profilometry for thickness, and electrical testing for resistivity. This study showed favorable results amongst thin lines widely spaced apart and thick bridge resistors.