Abstract Title

Douglas Fir Sap Flow Analysis Across An Elevation Gradient

Disciplines

Environmental Engineering | Forest Management | Other Plant Sciences

Abstract

The premise of my project is to understand and utilize data effectively from the transpiration of Douglas fir trees and calculate patterns across an elevation gradient. The data collected can be utilized to predict the influence of the trees on stream flow and the distribution of water throughout the watershed under climate change. Small sensors placed into the sapwood of the trees aid in determining how much water they transpire. The sensors are composed of two small hypodermic needles modified to have one heated and one reference probe. The trees take in moisture from the soil and the data collected from the sensors is taken back to the lab to be analyzed. Three sensor sites have been selected to at a high, mid, and low elevations in the Gibson Jack watershed near Pocatello, Idaho. Through the project we hope to gain a better understanding of transpiration across elevations and analyze the data from a mountainous watershed at the ex-urban fringe.

Comments

Poster #Th9

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Douglas Fir Sap Flow Analysis Across An Elevation Gradient

The premise of my project is to understand and utilize data effectively from the transpiration of Douglas fir trees and calculate patterns across an elevation gradient. The data collected can be utilized to predict the influence of the trees on stream flow and the distribution of water throughout the watershed under climate change. Small sensors placed into the sapwood of the trees aid in determining how much water they transpire. The sensors are composed of two small hypodermic needles modified to have one heated and one reference probe. The trees take in moisture from the soil and the data collected from the sensors is taken back to the lab to be analyzed. Three sensor sites have been selected to at a high, mid, and low elevations in the Gibson Jack watershed near Pocatello, Idaho. Through the project we hope to gain a better understanding of transpiration across elevations and analyze the data from a mountainous watershed at the ex-urban fringe.