Abstract Title

Deconstructing the Cell’s Mechanical Circuits by 3D Orbital Tracking Microrheology

Disciplines

Biophysics

Abstract

We seek to address a critical question in physical cell biology: is it possible to develop an ‘inventory’ of mechanical or force-sensing modules of cell and tissue behavior in analogy to the modules in biochemical signaling networks? To discover these mechanical modules we focus on a specific system of broad interest - cell extrusion in epithelial sheets. We will measure how chemical perturbations affect the mechanics and rheology of both the cytoplasm and the extracellular matrix of living cells. To measure intracellular viscoelasticity we will track a fluorescent particle or organelle using high-resolution 3D orbital tracking and high speed video microscopy. The mean squared displacement of the particle vs. time provides a measure of the frequency-dependent complex viscoelastic modulus. Finally we will monitor the regression of vasculature during pathway inhibition to deconstruct the chemical-mechanical circuits that regulate the vessel growth and retraction known as anoikis.

Comments

Poster #Th5

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Deconstructing the Cell’s Mechanical Circuits by 3D Orbital Tracking Microrheology

We seek to address a critical question in physical cell biology: is it possible to develop an ‘inventory’ of mechanical or force-sensing modules of cell and tissue behavior in analogy to the modules in biochemical signaling networks? To discover these mechanical modules we focus on a specific system of broad interest - cell extrusion in epithelial sheets. We will measure how chemical perturbations affect the mechanics and rheology of both the cytoplasm and the extracellular matrix of living cells. To measure intracellular viscoelasticity we will track a fluorescent particle or organelle using high-resolution 3D orbital tracking and high speed video microscopy. The mean squared displacement of the particle vs. time provides a measure of the frequency-dependent complex viscoelastic modulus. Finally we will monitor the regression of vasculature during pathway inhibition to deconstruct the chemical-mechanical circuits that regulate the vessel growth and retraction known as anoikis.