Abstract Title

Understanding Student Social Networks: A Case Study from the University of Idaho

Disciplines

Applied Statistics | Social and Cultural Anthropology | Social Statistics | Sociology

Abstract

One of the ongoing interests of many in academia today is the dynamics of student social life. Understanding student social networks can link to student success at the collegiate level. As part of a freshman class project students at the University of Idaho conducted a detailed study that attempted to map student social networks. Data was generated from approximately 250 surveys representing a cross-section of University of Idaho students. The survey asked students a series of questions about their daily lives, friendships and self-identity. The results proved to be quite revealing, providing quantitative data on a profoundly subjective topic, namely friendship. Specifically, the research identified very concrete differences based on gender and housing arrangement (e.g. Greek vs. Non-Greek living situations). It is research that has the potential to demystify the college social scene and increase personal networking abilities.

Comments

Poster #W68

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Understanding Student Social Networks: A Case Study from the University of Idaho

One of the ongoing interests of many in academia today is the dynamics of student social life. Understanding student social networks can link to student success at the collegiate level. As part of a freshman class project students at the University of Idaho conducted a detailed study that attempted to map student social networks. Data was generated from approximately 250 surveys representing a cross-section of University of Idaho students. The survey asked students a series of questions about their daily lives, friendships and self-identity. The results proved to be quite revealing, providing quantitative data on a profoundly subjective topic, namely friendship. Specifically, the research identified very concrete differences based on gender and housing arrangement (e.g. Greek vs. Non-Greek living situations). It is research that has the potential to demystify the college social scene and increase personal networking abilities.