Abstract Title

Non-Aqueous Electrolytes for Na-Ion Batteries

Presenter/Author/Faculty Mentor Information

Devan KarsannFollow
Hui Xiong (Mentor), Boise State UniversityFollow

Disciplines

Other Materials Science and Engineering

Abstract

Since their commercialization in the 1990s lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are the prevalent energy storage device for portable electronics. However, as energy storage technologies improve scientists are looking beyond LIBs to meet future demands. Unlike lithium, sodium supplies are virtually unlimited and evenly distributed worldwide which greatly reduces cost and increases availability of raw materials. However, before sodium-ion batteries (NIBs) can be successfully implemented there are several challenges which must be met, including the optimization of electrolyte systems. Titanium dioxide nanotubes (TiO2 NT) grown on titanium metal have been shown to reversibly incorporate sodium ions at room temperature and by investigating electrolyte systems we hope to improve electrochemical behavior and increase battery safety of NIBs.

Comments

Poster #W66

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Non-Aqueous Electrolytes for Na-Ion Batteries

Since their commercialization in the 1990s lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are the prevalent energy storage device for portable electronics. However, as energy storage technologies improve scientists are looking beyond LIBs to meet future demands. Unlike lithium, sodium supplies are virtually unlimited and evenly distributed worldwide which greatly reduces cost and increases availability of raw materials. However, before sodium-ion batteries (NIBs) can be successfully implemented there are several challenges which must be met, including the optimization of electrolyte systems. Titanium dioxide nanotubes (TiO2 NT) grown on titanium metal have been shown to reversibly incorporate sodium ions at room temperature and by investigating electrolyte systems we hope to improve electrochemical behavior and increase battery safety of NIBs.