Abstract Title

Detecting Low Magnitude Seismicity in Idaho

Disciplines

Geophysics and Seismology

Abstract

A large amount of passive seismic data has been collected throughout Idaho over the last decade. Interestingly, many areas in Idaho are tectonically active but exhibit little seismicity, for example the Owyhee Mountains in Southwest Idaho. In contrast, other well-known regions like Challis, ID, are very active, seismically speaking. Earthquakes in the crust release stress, and we suspect that in tectonically active regions we should observe earthquakes — large or small. We seek to answer the following question: Is the lack of seismicity in certain regions because there are no earthquakes or because existing detection methods fail to identify low magnitude earthquakes? We address this question by systematically reprocessing existing data with modern tools to identify small earthquakes recorded across local seismic networks. Once identified, we can locate these events in space and time. We will present the current state of this study, explain our improved methodology and compare our earthquake catalogue with the USGS catalogue.

Comments

Poster #Th62

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Detecting Low Magnitude Seismicity in Idaho

A large amount of passive seismic data has been collected throughout Idaho over the last decade. Interestingly, many areas in Idaho are tectonically active but exhibit little seismicity, for example the Owyhee Mountains in Southwest Idaho. In contrast, other well-known regions like Challis, ID, are very active, seismically speaking. Earthquakes in the crust release stress, and we suspect that in tectonically active regions we should observe earthquakes — large or small. We seek to answer the following question: Is the lack of seismicity in certain regions because there are no earthquakes or because existing detection methods fail to identify low magnitude earthquakes? We address this question by systematically reprocessing existing data with modern tools to identify small earthquakes recorded across local seismic networks. Once identified, we can locate these events in space and time. We will present the current state of this study, explain our improved methodology and compare our earthquake catalogue with the USGS catalogue.