Abstract Title

Reversible Permeabilization of Cell Membranes with Pore-Forming Toxins

Disciplines

Biophysics | Biotechnology

Abstract

The ability to reversibly control the transport of ions and molecules through cell membranes is essential for biotechnological and biomedical applications. Current techniques for achieving such control are either highly invasive or inefficient. To address these issues, we proposed the use of the pore-forming protein lysenin to reversibly permeabilize the membrane of mammalian cells. Our approach makes use of the outstanding capability of lysenin channels to act as nano-valves controlled by poly-cations. The success of the permeabilization process has been assessed using the membrane-impermeant fluorescent dye propidium iodide. The permeabilization process was stopped by the addition of chitosan and the cell viability after the treatment was assessed using live-cell indicators. This result supports that this method of temporary cell permeabilization may provide a simple and efficient tool for controlled delivery of exogenous molecules to large cell populations without requiring sophisticated instrumentation or technique.

Comments

Poster #Th59

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Reversible Permeabilization of Cell Membranes with Pore-Forming Toxins

The ability to reversibly control the transport of ions and molecules through cell membranes is essential for biotechnological and biomedical applications. Current techniques for achieving such control are either highly invasive or inefficient. To address these issues, we proposed the use of the pore-forming protein lysenin to reversibly permeabilize the membrane of mammalian cells. Our approach makes use of the outstanding capability of lysenin channels to act as nano-valves controlled by poly-cations. The success of the permeabilization process has been assessed using the membrane-impermeant fluorescent dye propidium iodide. The permeabilization process was stopped by the addition of chitosan and the cell viability after the treatment was assessed using live-cell indicators. This result supports that this method of temporary cell permeabilization may provide a simple and efficient tool for controlled delivery of exogenous molecules to large cell populations without requiring sophisticated instrumentation or technique.