Abstract Title

DNA Damage as a Biomarker of Endogenous Deleterious Oxidative Processes in the Sac-I Mutant of Chlamydomonas

Disciplines

Biotechnology | Cell Biology | Genetics | Molecular Genetics | Other Plant Sciences

Abstract

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a photoautotrophic alga which utilizes regulatory proteins to maintain photosynthetic machinery. The SacI mutant of Chlamydomonas is bleached and killed by high intensity light in the absence of nutrient sulfur. It is hypothesized that the bleaching and killing under sulfur depleted/high-intensity light conditions is due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in excess under these conditions, due to the inability of this mutant to downregulate photosynthesis. Here we present characterization of the killing effect of the sulfur depleted/high-intensity light conditions as well as biochemical evidence that such ROS are indeed produced in excess (relative to nutrient-replete conditions), using Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-sensitive sites in cellular DNA as a biomarker of such ROS production.

Comments

Poster #W11

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DNA Damage as a Biomarker of Endogenous Deleterious Oxidative Processes in the Sac-I Mutant of Chlamydomonas

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a photoautotrophic alga which utilizes regulatory proteins to maintain photosynthetic machinery. The SacI mutant of Chlamydomonas is bleached and killed by high intensity light in the absence of nutrient sulfur. It is hypothesized that the bleaching and killing under sulfur depleted/high-intensity light conditions is due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in excess under these conditions, due to the inability of this mutant to downregulate photosynthesis. Here we present characterization of the killing effect of the sulfur depleted/high-intensity light conditions as well as biochemical evidence that such ROS are indeed produced in excess (relative to nutrient-replete conditions), using Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-sensitive sites in cellular DNA as a biomarker of such ROS production.