Abstract Title

In-Solution Stacking of 2-Dimensional Flakes

Disciplines

Other Materials Science and Engineering

Abstract

Since the isolation of single-layer graphene in 2004, there has been an abundance of interest in atomically thin materials. With thicknesses on the order of single atoms to a few atoms, these 2-dimensial (2D) crystals exhibit unique physical properties as compared to their bulk counterparts. In this study, we investigate the large-scale production of graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, and WS2 through liquid-phase and chemical exfoliation processes. Once in solution, we tune the surface energy interactions between the solution and 2D materials to induce stacking of 2D based heterostructures and use atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy to characterize our resulting heterostructures. Our results suggest in-solution stacking as a potential route to large-scale manufacturing of 2D based heterostructures for applications in nanoelectronics, energy conversion, and thermal barrier coatings.

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In-Solution Stacking of 2-Dimensional Flakes

Since the isolation of single-layer graphene in 2004, there has been an abundance of interest in atomically thin materials. With thicknesses on the order of single atoms to a few atoms, these 2-dimensial (2D) crystals exhibit unique physical properties as compared to their bulk counterparts. In this study, we investigate the large-scale production of graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, and WS2 through liquid-phase and chemical exfoliation processes. Once in solution, we tune the surface energy interactions between the solution and 2D materials to induce stacking of 2D based heterostructures and use atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy to characterize our resulting heterostructures. Our results suggest in-solution stacking as a potential route to large-scale manufacturing of 2D based heterostructures for applications in nanoelectronics, energy conversion, and thermal barrier coatings.