Abstract Title

In Vitro Anti-Trichomonas Activity of Nucleoside Transition State Analogs

Disciplines

Enzymes and Coenzymes | Infectious Disease | Medical Microbiology | Nucleic Acids, Nucleotides, and Nucleosides | Pharmaceutics and Drug Design

Abstract

Trichomonas vaginalis is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STI) diagnosed each year in the United States. Unfortunately, Trichomonas has become increasingly resistant Metronidazole (MTZ), the primary FDA approved drug used for its treatment. Finding an alternative treatment for both resistant and nonresistant strains of Trichomonas is critical. The enzyme 5’Methylthioadesosine Nucleosidase (MTN) is a potential target because it is responsible for the salvage of purines required for parasite survival. In this study, transition state analog inhibitors of MTN were tested for in vitro activity against Trichomonas vaginalis cultures. Effectiveness was compared to MTZ treatments for both resistant and nonresistant strains of Trichomonas. Results suggest that MTN inhibitors may be useful new antiparasitic agents to successfully treat MTZ-resistant and sensitive strains of Trichomonas.

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In Vitro Anti-Trichomonas Activity of Nucleoside Transition State Analogs

Trichomonas vaginalis is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STI) diagnosed each year in the United States. Unfortunately, Trichomonas has become increasingly resistant Metronidazole (MTZ), the primary FDA approved drug used for its treatment. Finding an alternative treatment for both resistant and nonresistant strains of Trichomonas is critical. The enzyme 5’Methylthioadesosine Nucleosidase (MTN) is a potential target because it is responsible for the salvage of purines required for parasite survival. In this study, transition state analog inhibitors of MTN were tested for in vitro activity against Trichomonas vaginalis cultures. Effectiveness was compared to MTZ treatments for both resistant and nonresistant strains of Trichomonas. Results suggest that MTN inhibitors may be useful new antiparasitic agents to successfully treat MTZ-resistant and sensitive strains of Trichomonas.