Abstract Title

Quantitative Investigation of Spotting as a Fast and Simple Procedure for Colorimetric Detection of DNA

Disciplines

Biochemistry

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to compare the behavior of gold nanoparticles in DNA spotting as opposed to particles in an aggregated solution. Gold nanoparticles are used as visual markers due to their ability to change from red to blue with the presence of target DNA. This methodology could detect a variety of targets such as pathogens and genetic mutations. While typical aggregations can take hours, DNA spotting could be less time consuming. DNA spotting accelerates nanoparticle aggregation by creating a highly concentrated solution. It could be a cheaper and faster alternative to typical aggregations because it doesn’t require the use of expensive instruments. We have synthesized gold nanoparticles and attached thiolated DNA; these will be mixed with different target DNA concentrations, and their optical properties will be recorded over time. Solutions will be spotted at different time intervals and compared to aggregation results, which will enable the establishment of practical procedure. The development of this procedure would be pivotal in the detection and diagnosis of various diseases worldwide. This project was supported by an ACS Project SEED Fellowship awarded to MG.

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Quantitative Investigation of Spotting as a Fast and Simple Procedure for Colorimetric Detection of DNA

The purpose of this study is to compare the behavior of gold nanoparticles in DNA spotting as opposed to particles in an aggregated solution. Gold nanoparticles are used as visual markers due to their ability to change from red to blue with the presence of target DNA. This methodology could detect a variety of targets such as pathogens and genetic mutations. While typical aggregations can take hours, DNA spotting could be less time consuming. DNA spotting accelerates nanoparticle aggregation by creating a highly concentrated solution. It could be a cheaper and faster alternative to typical aggregations because it doesn’t require the use of expensive instruments. We have synthesized gold nanoparticles and attached thiolated DNA; these will be mixed with different target DNA concentrations, and their optical properties will be recorded over time. Solutions will be spotted at different time intervals and compared to aggregation results, which will enable the establishment of practical procedure. The development of this procedure would be pivotal in the detection and diagnosis of various diseases worldwide. This project was supported by an ACS Project SEED Fellowship awarded to MG.