Abstract Title

Enrichment, Isolation, and Characterization of Novel Bacteriophage Capable of Lysing Pathogenic Strains of Escherichia coli

Disciplines

Animal Diseases | Bacteria | Bacterial Infections and Mycoses | Digestive System Diseases | Food Microbiology | Pathogenic Microbiology | Therapeutics | Virology | Viruses

Abstract

The aim of this project is to isolate novel bacteriophage that are capable of lysing pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, specifically organisms in the EHEC (Enterohemorrhagic E. coli) groups 1 and 2 and the STEC (Shiga Toxin-producing E. coli) groups 1 and 2. These strains are of particular interest as they have been the etiologic agent of a number of outbreaks of human dysentery, some cases of which have been fatal. We hypothesize that samples from various sources will contain bacteriophage that can be isolated, with samples from locations unlikely to have seen standard strains of pathogenic E. coli yielding more phylotypes of bacteriophage which display different host range specificities to pathogenic E. coli in the EHEC 1, EHEC 2, STEC 1, and STEC 2 groups. It is expected that bacteriophage stocks produced from “extreme” samples will be less likely to encounter resistance from the host’s protective mechanisms such as the CRISPR system. These bacteriophage stocks could be used in development of novel prophylactic treatments, decontamination protocols, or post-infection treatments to control the spread and pathogenesis of disease-causing E. coli.

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Enrichment, Isolation, and Characterization of Novel Bacteriophage Capable of Lysing Pathogenic Strains of Escherichia coli

The aim of this project is to isolate novel bacteriophage that are capable of lysing pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, specifically organisms in the EHEC (Enterohemorrhagic E. coli) groups 1 and 2 and the STEC (Shiga Toxin-producing E. coli) groups 1 and 2. These strains are of particular interest as they have been the etiologic agent of a number of outbreaks of human dysentery, some cases of which have been fatal. We hypothesize that samples from various sources will contain bacteriophage that can be isolated, with samples from locations unlikely to have seen standard strains of pathogenic E. coli yielding more phylotypes of bacteriophage which display different host range specificities to pathogenic E. coli in the EHEC 1, EHEC 2, STEC 1, and STEC 2 groups. It is expected that bacteriophage stocks produced from “extreme” samples will be less likely to encounter resistance from the host’s protective mechanisms such as the CRISPR system. These bacteriophage stocks could be used in development of novel prophylactic treatments, decontamination protocols, or post-infection treatments to control the spread and pathogenesis of disease-causing E. coli.