Abstract Title

Viral Growth Dynamics and Disease Severity in Respiratory Viral Co-infections

Disciplines

Immunology of Infectious Disease | Virology

Abstract

Two or more viruses are frequently detected in patients with severe respiratory tract infections. However, it is not clear how unrelated respiratory viruses interact within a host to alter disease severity compared to single virus infections. We have developed a mouse model with in vivo and in vitro components to study the effects of viral co-infection on disease severity and viral growth dynamics. Mice were infected with a mild respiratory pathogen, rhinovirus 1B (RV1B), followed two days later with influenza A virus (PR8) at low and high doses. Mice were monitored for morbidity and mortality and viral titers were quantified in lung tissues. We will compare data from single virus and co-infected groups to determine how co-infection affects disease and viral loads. The same viruses are being used for in vitro studies to determine how co-infection alters viral growth dynamics within cultured lung epithelial cells. The results of these studies will provide insight into the interactions between unrelated respiratory viruses during co-infection of shared host cells and organisms. This will provide critical insight into the pathogenesis of respiratory viral co-infections.

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Viral Growth Dynamics and Disease Severity in Respiratory Viral Co-infections

Two or more viruses are frequently detected in patients with severe respiratory tract infections. However, it is not clear how unrelated respiratory viruses interact within a host to alter disease severity compared to single virus infections. We have developed a mouse model with in vivo and in vitro components to study the effects of viral co-infection on disease severity and viral growth dynamics. Mice were infected with a mild respiratory pathogen, rhinovirus 1B (RV1B), followed two days later with influenza A virus (PR8) at low and high doses. Mice were monitored for morbidity and mortality and viral titers were quantified in lung tissues. We will compare data from single virus and co-infected groups to determine how co-infection affects disease and viral loads. The same viruses are being used for in vitro studies to determine how co-infection alters viral growth dynamics within cultured lung epithelial cells. The results of these studies will provide insight into the interactions between unrelated respiratory viruses during co-infection of shared host cells and organisms. This will provide critical insight into the pathogenesis of respiratory viral co-infections.