Abstract Title

The Synthesis of Titanium (IV) Oxide Nanotubes via Hydrothermal Process for use as Anode Material in Sodium-ion Batteries

Disciplines

Materials Science and Engineering

Abstract

Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have been commercialized because they are an efficient energy storage device for many applications. We must reevaluate LIBs to develop sustainable energy in the future. Sodium-ion batteries (NIBs) are being considered as a replacement for LIBs due to the high availability and low cost of sodium, and their standard electrode potential allowing them to provide comparable specific capacity. Synthesizing an anode material for use in a NIB with a comparable cell potential and capacity is the focus of current research. Titania is a promising anode material due to its excellent cyclic stability, reversible sodium intercalation, and high rate performance. Herein, hydrothermal synthesis was utilized to form titania nanoparticles for use as an anode material. The structures were analyzed and characterized using SEM and TEM to confirm morphology and size distribution, while XRD determined the phase of the titania. The parameters of temperature, concentration of NaOH, and duration of hydrothermal synthesis were manipulated to optimize the titania structures. The resulting materials were used as the anode in a NIB and the cyclic performance was tested.

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The Synthesis of Titanium (IV) Oxide Nanotubes via Hydrothermal Process for use as Anode Material in Sodium-ion Batteries

Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have been commercialized because they are an efficient energy storage device for many applications. We must reevaluate LIBs to develop sustainable energy in the future. Sodium-ion batteries (NIBs) are being considered as a replacement for LIBs due to the high availability and low cost of sodium, and their standard electrode potential allowing them to provide comparable specific capacity. Synthesizing an anode material for use in a NIB with a comparable cell potential and capacity is the focus of current research. Titania is a promising anode material due to its excellent cyclic stability, reversible sodium intercalation, and high rate performance. Herein, hydrothermal synthesis was utilized to form titania nanoparticles for use as an anode material. The structures were analyzed and characterized using SEM and TEM to confirm morphology and size distribution, while XRD determined the phase of the titania. The parameters of temperature, concentration of NaOH, and duration of hydrothermal synthesis were manipulated to optimize the titania structures. The resulting materials were used as the anode in a NIB and the cyclic performance was tested.