Abstract Title

Osprey Habitat Suitability in West-Central Idaho: Impacts of Water Body Characteristics on the Breeding Success of a Sentinel Species

Disciplines

Ornithology | Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecology

Abstract

Ospreys (Pandion hailaetus) are fish-eating, top predators of aquatic ecosystems that are adapted to human landscapes and useful sentinel species for monitoring environmental contaminants and ecosystem health. Ospreys have been a focal point of conservation and study since their extensive decline from 1950-1970. While the majority of populations in the USA have recovered, breeding densities in many areas are variable; with many areas unoccupied despite the apparent existence of quality habitat. Environmental, water and habitat characteristics as well as prey availability, human disturbance and contaminants are known to affect osprey nesting success. In light of increasing human encroachment on osprey breeding habitat in Long Valley Idaho, we set out to evaluate relationships among water quality parameters and osprey nesting success. We used a multivariate generalized linear model with model selection procedures to evaluate the relative importance of physical water characteristics on osprey nesting success. Here, we present the results of our model and discuss their applications for conservation efforts and osprey management guidelines.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Osprey Habitat Suitability in West-Central Idaho: Impacts of Water Body Characteristics on the Breeding Success of a Sentinel Species

Ospreys (Pandion hailaetus) are fish-eating, top predators of aquatic ecosystems that are adapted to human landscapes and useful sentinel species for monitoring environmental contaminants and ecosystem health. Ospreys have been a focal point of conservation and study since their extensive decline from 1950-1970. While the majority of populations in the USA have recovered, breeding densities in many areas are variable; with many areas unoccupied despite the apparent existence of quality habitat. Environmental, water and habitat characteristics as well as prey availability, human disturbance and contaminants are known to affect osprey nesting success. In light of increasing human encroachment on osprey breeding habitat in Long Valley Idaho, we set out to evaluate relationships among water quality parameters and osprey nesting success. We used a multivariate generalized linear model with model selection procedures to evaluate the relative importance of physical water characteristics on osprey nesting success. Here, we present the results of our model and discuss their applications for conservation efforts and osprey management guidelines.