Abstract Title

The Distribution of Amphibians in the Portneuf Drainage

Disciplines

Animal Sciences | Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Abstract

The goal of this study was to determine the distribution of amphibian species in the Portneuf drainageof Southeast Idaho as part of a Managing Idaho’s Landscapes for Ecosystem Services (MILES) study, an NSF/EPSCoR project to discern the impact of urban development and climate change on social and ecological systems and services in mid-sized Idaho cities. We compiled historic amphibian records from museum collections, surveys, Idaho Department of Fish and Game records, and contributed observations. We imported these records into ArcMap and created dot distribution maps for each of the 6 amphibian species found within the drainage. Preliminary results suggest that amphibian populations have declined throughout the drainage (especially in and around the Pocatello area) with the drainage-wide loss of 1 species, the Western Toad, Anaxyrus boreas. We plan to resurvey the historic amphibian locations to compare with our current results and add new data to the distribution maps. The final results will benefit Federal, State, County, and City organizations by helping to plan for future changes regarding these species, two of which have recently been considered for Endangered Species status.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

The Distribution of Amphibians in the Portneuf Drainage

The goal of this study was to determine the distribution of amphibian species in the Portneuf drainageof Southeast Idaho as part of a Managing Idaho’s Landscapes for Ecosystem Services (MILES) study, an NSF/EPSCoR project to discern the impact of urban development and climate change on social and ecological systems and services in mid-sized Idaho cities. We compiled historic amphibian records from museum collections, surveys, Idaho Department of Fish and Game records, and contributed observations. We imported these records into ArcMap and created dot distribution maps for each of the 6 amphibian species found within the drainage. Preliminary results suggest that amphibian populations have declined throughout the drainage (especially in and around the Pocatello area) with the drainage-wide loss of 1 species, the Western Toad, Anaxyrus boreas. We plan to resurvey the historic amphibian locations to compare with our current results and add new data to the distribution maps. The final results will benefit Federal, State, County, and City organizations by helping to plan for future changes regarding these species, two of which have recently been considered for Endangered Species status.